1. Why should I trust The Craft with my sermons?
2. What are The Craft's credentials?
3. How will The Craft's analyses help me preach in the future?
4. What happens if The Craft disagrees with a sermon theologically?
5. What about the aspects of preaching you can't really analyze?


1. Why should I trust The Craft with my sermons?

This question gets right to the core of why The Craft works so well. You already trust many people you may not know very well to analyze your sermons: your church. The feedback from those in your congregation, know them or not, probably matters to you. Furthermore, while preachers often say they want to personally know those who analyze their sermons, they are not asking those they actually know for substantial sermon analysis. They are not asking because they may not know anyone with a blueprint ready to properly analyze a sermon, like us. Church members can spot a clear and compelling sermon, but many cannot explain why a sermon is clear or compelling. We can. 

With The Craft you do not have to worry about your sermon analyzer sitting in your church every week. You do not have to worry if they are biased for or against you. You do not have to burden your spouse with the work of breaking down your sermons. All you have to do is understand how we will analyze your sermons and leave the rest to us. We have the resources and passion to help you hone your craft.


2. What are The Craft's credentials?

The Craft will have a Board of Advisors ranging anywhere from men completing a Masters of Divinity to men completing a Doctorate of Ministry with a focus on preaching, including pastors who preach weekly. However, The Craft is not entirely dependent on credentials. The most important feedback comes from average listeners, most of whom have no preaching "credentials". Credentials do not necessitate being able to analyze a sermon. With that said, The Craft has created an analysis blueprint that would have been difficult to create without an understanding of basic and advanced preaching principles.   


3. How will The Craft's analyses help me preach in the future?

Henry Ford said, "If you always do what you've always done, you'll always get what you've always got." If a preacher does not know what he does to make his sermons confusing, he may keep doing it. If you can see in a real sermon where you forgot to practice a given preaching principle, you can change. You can avoid simple and significant mistakes in future sermons. The Craft not only reveals blind spots, we reveal your skills and strengths. Our analyses will put tools in your hand to begin applying to your preaching immediately.  


4. What happens if The Craft disagrees with a sermon theologically?

We desire to help preachers who are seeking to preach the Bible. Our analyses always cover how biblical texts are used in a sermon. We leave no room for question here on our website and in our reports that preachers are called to preach God's Word. Preachers are called to understand a biblical text and then preach that text. We go a step further and make it clear that the Bible is ultimately about Jesus Christ and reveal when sermons major on Him. We know that we will analyze sermons with which we have theological disagreements. In all things we desire to be charitable. We will not point out where we disagree on debatable issues within Christian orthodoxy.

With that being said, we do not hesitate to make it clear when a sermon is in error due to heresy, promotion of sin, being unclear about salvation by grace alone, being unclear about salvation through faith alone, being unclear about salvation in Christ alone, and the like. We also will point out when a sermon undeniably makes an insignificant attempt, if any, to be based in the Bible, for this would deny the very purpose of a sermon. We seek to do all of the above with charity, respect, and clarity. 


5. What about the aspects of preaching you can't really analyze?

The Craft has a narrow focus to help preachers preach clear and compelling sermons through applying preaching and communication principles. There are certain aspects of preaching that are more difficult to breakdown into an analysis, such as the work of the Holy Spirit. The Holy Spirit can use a poorly communicated sermon powerfully. We may analyze such a sermon, noting the ways in which it can improve, but our analysis will not be able to record data about the work of God's Spirit. As another example, we believe preachers will be more effective when they let their biblical material sink deep into their own hearts. However, this is not something easily compiled into an analysis. These are things on which we will consult with preachers as opportunity arises.